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As the new year is rung in I look back on what has gotten me through 36 years of life as well as 2020… which may as well of been 36 years rolled into one. The biggest reason I am where I am in this bootcamp and in this life is due to my family and friends. While I am James Ardery the individual I am also a member of the Ardery family. While I am Jame Ardery the student I am also a member of the Flatiron 100520 cohort. While I am capable of handling many situations on my own other situations I very need my family and friends to help get me through. Be it a code concept I am struggling with or just a hurdle in life that has brought me down. …


Mod 3 at Flatiron and the firehose to the face only seems to be gaining steam. Trying to recover from such whiplash is a slow process. My instructors promise that in time and with lots of practice things will become clear. I am waiting…. See what I did there :). So the slow and steady journey through Flatiron bootcamp and JavaScript continues as I search for parallels that bridge the gap between the digital and real world.

In JavaScript the “promise” has proven to be such a bridge. Up until this point in bootcamp most of the applications and processes we have built were fairly light in load and responsibility. With the introduction of JS and the single page application a new hurdle arises. Javascript is synchronous code with a thread of execution that runs from top to bottom and left to right. In domain models with multiple view pages breaking up work load and processing is a more manageable task but in the world of single page applications load time and time to process requests is money. The longer elements of application or the application itself takes to load the less likely a user will stick around. One tool Javascript came up with to juggle the workload associated with a single page applications is the promise. The JavaScript promise is very similar to a promise we would encounter in real life. …


As I continue my dive into the world of software engineering I find myself searching for a balance between the real world I live in and the digital world I am so often lost in. Where is the common ground between the digital world and reality? Where and how do humans interact with computers these days? Well the most common interaction today comes in the form of browsing the world wide web. The world wide web, commonly referred to but not to be confused with, “the internet”, is the gold standard for human computer interaction. The oldest grandparents to the freakiest youth are constantly online, surfing the web for whatever their hearts desire. So what is the difference between the internet and the world wide web? To be very brief the internet is a physical network of cables actually connecting all major land masses on the planet to one another! …


As a Flatiron bootcamp enrollee new to the world of software engineering and programming languages (Ruby to be specific), I have found myself drowning at many moments trying to wrap my head around the constant barrage of new subjects being thrown at me. In these moments of drowning I try to zoom out and gain perspective on any given subject as a whole in an effort to better understand how the subject works in its nitty gritty details. One specific subject that caused this zoom out moment was SCOPE. SCOPE as a concept manifests itself in Ruby when looking at the different variable types of the language. Ruby has a total of four variable types each ranging in SCOPE of influence. The four variable types are $global, @@class, @instance, and _local. They each have their own set of limitations defined by their SCOPE of influence. …

About

James Ardery

Budding Software Engineer trying to find the tie that binds 🤔

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